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Studio Culture Week

On Monday, it was the start of Studio Culture Week. The year group were divided into smaller groups with a tutor and sent to various studio spaces across London. These studios were ranging from high end commercial to simple and personal. My group were asked to go to two studio, Fraser Muggeridge and Toby Liegh/Mentmore Studios.

Fraser Muggeridge studio (Fraser Muggeridge, Luke Hall, Jules Estèves, Rachel Treliving and Elena Papassissa) is a graphic design company based in Clerkenwell, London. Throughout a wide range of formats, from artists’ books and exhibition catalogues to posters, marketing material and websites, the studio prioritises artists’ and writers’ content over the imposition of a signature style.” – Fraser Muggeridge.

We went Fraser Muggeridge Studio, where the group got to meet the founder of the company, Fraser Muggeridge. In our induction, Fraser explained who the company were and explained the studio. The studio was shared with another creative company. The size of the room was really small and cramped. There were things on the walls that members of the studios put up as inspiration and some walls has layers of works which meant that over the years there were a lot changes happened.

When entering the room I noticed how tiny the studio space was. We learned that two studio were sharing the room. This was the case because it was easy for both studios to share printer and the libary. Sharing the room is easy for both studios because it was sharing the rent would be cheap.

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The company has done work for varies different clients and they had to create books, poster catalogues, DVD covers, website. This was an example of a catalogue they had to design.

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Fraser also used showed us the examples of covers he has that he could look over and that could inspire him.

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The studio has also created their own font type and used in existing work. They have said to create this type, they combined different existing type and merged them. I think the text looks cute but I wouldn’t use it because it’s looks like a type that would be used in 16th century and I wouldn’t use it in a catalogue or booklet unless it was based on a theme that would require a fancy type.

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The studio also created a dvd/blu ray cover and content of the website of a film called “Call Me Daddy”. The studio was commissioned by the people behind the film create this. the website content mainly consisted of gif that studio created using Adobe After Effect.

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The size of this studio is so small that things like folders and piles of papers were moved to make some space for the group to sit down. only 8 people managed to get a seat. The whole room is covered with posters, letters and other forms of work postured around the room.

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Looking around the room, I got a sense of creative process and celebration of the work. In this image, there were about 10 pages of work piled up on the wall. This was because studio were different creating and changing and this wall showed how much work has evolving.

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Because there were two studios sharing the room and equipment, There weren’t much of a distinction between whose work was which studio. The work that was on the wall looked like it could of been done by one studio.

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What I actually love about this studio space was the large book shelf. I just found it amazing how many resource and books there were in a tiny space and wonder how they managed to keep all the books in one place.

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After talking with Fraser Muggeridge studios, the group went to the second studio of the day, Mentmore studio.

“Mentmore Studios is a community of creatives within a converted Victorian factory in London Fields, Hackney. Consisting of four large studio spaces, one workshop, two outside yards, storage potential, two kitchens, shower and WC facilities – we’ve got it all!”Mentmore Studios.

The second studio the group went to was called Mentmore Studios where the group got to meet an illustrator named Toby Liegh. Toby worked at a corner of a room where he had a small wall of inspiration and beside him was a shelf of books.

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The whole room was shared with other designers and everyone have a part of a room that they work in and if they wanted to shared something like a book, they can share it. The studio was so much larger compared to the first one and the space I thought was better in a sense that there was so much space to work in and in the middle of the room, there was a long table for the designers to work in and was a wall filled of postcards that all the designers in the room participate in. Just looking at the wall, I sense a community among the designers even though the designers work in different fields.

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Toby Liegh was showing his desk and where works a lot in. He also showcased his work that he created for clients.

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Toby told us that it is a good idea to have a project that you’re interested to work in for yourself. He said if there is anything that the students are interested in then you do it because working just for clients would be just boring and having a project that is really tailored for around you will make your job as a designer more interesting and more enjoyable.

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The wall behind Toby are bits and bobs that he collected that he has found interested and collected them over time.

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He showed his digital work that he created. These were illustrations that he created using a different name. Toby explained that when creating design work, he works with two names.

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